Data Cabling Cat5e Cat6/6a Cabling

Should you upgrade your Cat5 cable to Cat6 or Cat6a?

23 Mar 2014
cable tester ,Data Cabling, Cat5e ,Cat6/6a CablingA business decision is approaching. Most companies have Cat5/5e cable in their offices. And it has served well in providing reliable data access to servers, peripherals and the Internet. Cat5/5e runs at speeds up to 1gb (also known as 1000Base-T). Cat6 runs at 10gb but has sorter runs. Whereas Cat5 can have cable lengths of up to 100m, Cat6 maxes out at 55m. This number falls to 37m in a hostile environment.  To achieve full 100m cable lengths maximum while minimizing the risks of crosstalk, it is advisable to install Cat6a cable.

Ultimately, this decision is about costs vs. gains. And before a decision can be made, it is critically important to determine if your existing cable infrastructure is running into bottlenecks that cause traffic slowdowns at the desktop for your users. Internet might only needs about 5 - 25mb of bandwidth. But if your office has a lot of workstations and/or a group of users that are utilizing data-intensive publishing or graphic applications, you might need more speed. We have sophisticated network monitoring tools that can determine the traffic across your network. If we determine that you are using all available bandwidth, than your decision will be based on solid information.

Cat6 and Cat6a will boost your network speeds to 10gb/sec. Can you afford to upgrade to Cat6/6a? If the costs justify the expense, please contact us. We will send out one of our top network cabling technicians to analyze your network and determine if this upgrade option is a good idea for your office. And if it is, we will follow up with a proposal all at no cost to your firm.

 
Data Cabling ,Cat5e ,Cat6/6a Cabling,Network Cable Rack

Upgrade Comparison: Cat6a vs. Cat7 vs. Fiber Cabling Analysis

10 Mar 2014

We were asked to bid on a cabling project that was fairly straight-forward. It involved replacing the existing Cat5e cable with either Cat6a, Cat7 or fiber cable. The site was an open, standard modern office with a drop ceiling and hollow office walls. The client needed 64 single drops to existing faceplates, three new 24-port patch panels and patch cables.


The need for higher speeds by the client was created by a demand for faster access to larger files from the Server. This potential client was involved with heavy drafting and multimedia applications that require more bandwidth through the cabling system. Cat5e yields up to 1000Base-T, 1-Gigabit, data transfer speed.


The challenge is in deciding on which type of cable to use. Cat6a and fiber are very standard solutions. But Cat7 is not  at all a standard installation yet (and might not ever be one). The problems with Cat7 are that the cable is very heavy,

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