Network Cabling Data Cabling Cat5e Cat6/6a Cabling

Cabling Tips for Security Cameras

12 Mar 2015

CablingNetwork Cabling, Data Cabling, Cat5e, Cat6/6a Cabling,security system is definitely not the showy part of any security system. Nevertheless, it is an essential component of the system. It may seem complicated. There are many considerations in choosing and installing cables to ensure that the security system functions properly. Cables basically provide power for camera installation and transmit signals going back to the digital video recorder (DVR).



Deciding on the Perfect Cabling


Find out whether the system is analog (alternating current frequency has been modified) or digital (electronic technology). Then, you can figure out the proper cable for installation of your security cameras. Or simply refer to the manufacturing specs on the camera system.


The second step is to determine if your camera is powered remotely or connected to a nearby power outlet. It may be necessary to combine power and video cables. Security power and video cables can run next to each other or within one cable jacket. This makes installation easier by pulling one instead of two separate wires.


Make sure to test the cable before you install the CCTV. Examine each cable at the DVR position just to make sure that the cables are working prior to installation.



Cabling Guidelines


Quite often security cameras require coaxial cables to send video from the camera to your recorder. With the RG59 type of coax cable, it is possible to position the camera up to 600 feet away. The RG6 coax cable, on the other hand, may be extended up to 1,000 feet. Cut the cable according to your preferred length but leave an extra service loop of 10 – 20 feet for future flexibility.



What are the steps to follow?



  • Make the necessary BNC connection on the cable. This is a small quick round connector primarily for coaxial cables.

  • Plug one end of the BNC cable to the camera and the other to your DVR.

  • Strip the shield of the power cable to expose the black and red wires. Then, remove the jacket (at least ¼ inch) from each wire.

  • Put the wires inside the terminal block at the end of the female power wire plait. It should be red on red wires and black on black wires. Tighten screws on the terminals. Plug the camera into the fitting at the side of the braid.

  • Attach wires directly to the positive and negative leads respectively in the power box. Red wire is for positive while black is for negative. This is applicable if you will connect the camera to a multiple camera power supply unit.

  • In case you will attach the camera to a single power unit, connect the male power wire braid as well as power supply to the tip of the tress.


Now, the installation is complete and you are ready to use the system.

 

 
Network Cabling ,Data Cabling, Fiber-optic cable,New York City

Unique Properties of Fiber Optic Cabling

30 Dec 2014

Network Cabling ,Data Cabling, Fiber-optic cableFiber optics is capable of resolving many issues in data communications. However, computer data is normally transmitted over ordinary copper cables because it's adequate at lower speeds and shorter distances. It is not advisable to utilize fiber cable in these ordinary instances because of the high costs.


Fiber is impervious to electromagnetic interference because the signals are transmitted as light impulses. That means that Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) is not possible. Light waves are not effected by magnetism. This type of impediment can happen in coaxial and Cat5/6 cables because electricity can interfere with data signals over copper wires. Magnetic fields produce electrical current and this electromagnetic Interference is noise that can scramble data.


Fiber optic cabling also is much better at providing security of data since electromagnetic fields are not emitted around optical fibers. The data is restricted within the structure of the cable making it impossible to tap signals being communicated without cutting across the fiber. Emissions can not be easily intercepted. Hence, the fiber is by far most secure channel for carrying sensitive data.


Fiber is also a “non-conductive cable” because there is no metal in its design. It's a highly purified glass fiber.  While copper is a conductive cable that can attract power surges and unwanted current. With fiber, outdoor varieties are costly because these call for special strength. Therefore, fiber optic cable is usually more cost-effective for indoor use. With copper, it is also important to get rid of the current commonly known as ground loop. The metal cable can run into signal transmission distortions due to slight transmissions in electricity.


Fiber optics also does away with threats coming from sparks. The transmission of signals can be hazardous because of this phenomenon. Although the spark itself is not dangerous, it can lead to greater problems especially in industrial and chemical plants where the air is polluted by possibly dangerous vapors. Fiber cable does not generate sparks because it carries no electrical current.


Installation of fiber is less difficult because of its small size and flexibility. And fiber optic cables can pass along the same route as electric cable without producing any noise. The size, lightness and elasticity of fiber optic cables also makes them suitable for short-term or portable installations. And they transmit signals over longer distances too. Amplifying the transmission capability of copper wire cables makes them more unyielding. Thicker copper cables are also hard to mount in spaces where the cables have to pass through cable conduits and concrete walls.


Fiber optic means higher bandwidth too. It has the capability to transmit high-speed signals over lengthy distances without repeaters, unlike copper cables. The fiber optic’s range is not infinite but it is way more than copper cable.


If you need help in figuring out the ideal cabling topology, contact us or call 202-462-4290 for a free on-site survey and proposal.



 
Network Cabling, Data Cabling

Choosing Plenum Cables for Plenum Space

5 Sep 2014

Office Cabling Network Cabling, New York City The plenum space is described as that section of the building that makes possible air movement for HVAC systems. It also provides the space for conduits of heated, conditioned and return air circulation. The distance between the structural ceiling and dropped ceiling tiles is regarded as the plenum space.


The plenum space houses communication cables for telephone and computer networks. However, increasing neglect of cables in plenum areas create a major risk in case of fire.

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Data Cabling Cat5e Cat6/6a Cabling

Abandoned Cable Liability Issue

17 Oct 2013
 Cabling,Data Cabling Cat5e Cat6/6a Cabling

As tenants come and go in a commercial building, the cabling infrastructure sometimes leaves behind abandoned Cat5, Cat6 and coax cabling. All that needs to happen is for the new tenant to request a reconfigured layout that relocates the main wall closet. Or, sometimes the old tenant will cut away the cabling in order to take the patch panels with them. If possible, keep the wall closet location. And always offer to buy the patch panels from a departing tenant.



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IT support, network infrastructure

What is “Structured Cabling”?

27 Dec 2012

data cabling,structured network cables Traditionally computer network designers developed their systems with the assumption that they will operate on a specific type of cable using a specific type of connector. Thus, each manufacturer has its own cable and connector "standard," but that standard was for their own system only. For example, here are some “standard” cable/connector systems in use:

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