Network Cabling, Cabling Installations New York City Atlanta GA

Your First Conversation with a Cabling Installation Company

26 Feb 2018

Network Cabling, Cabling Installations New York City Atlanta GANow that your business is ready to install new cabling or perform an upgrade, you will be meeting with a cabling installation company that has been vetted to discuss the project. Typically, the contractor will ask several standard questions to gain a good understanding of the project and make an evaluation. The questions are organized under topics and discussed in the paragraphs below.



Moving


When does your business plan to move? If the move is in the next two months, have arrangements been made for the phone or T1 lines with the telecommunications provider?


Although this is a key component when moving an office, many companies neglect it. Some telecoms need a 45-day notice for a T1 installation, so your move must take this into account.



Voice and Data Drops


What will be the number of voice and data drops required? A drop is a cable run usually starting from a server room or wiring closet and terminating at a cubicle, workstation, or office. Keep in mind that each station will typically require a drop for each computer and telephone line. Drops will also be needed for office equipment such as fax machines and network printers.



Construction


What kind of construction was done at the new office location? Does it have a hard cap ceiling, which most houses have, or a drop/acoustic ceiling? Facilitating access for running cables, drop ceilings are far easier than hard cap ceilings for installations, modifications, and upgrades.



Cabling Type


Is plenum or non-plenum cabling needed at the new office location? When cabling has to run over a ceiling where the space is already utilized for a HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) system, then plenum-rated cable will be required because of its fire retardant and smoke-limiting capabilities. Plenum is a bit more expensive, but required to comply with code.



Phone System


Will the current phone system be transferred to the new office? The cabling installation company may not be capable of handling the type your business is using, therefore a subcontractor may be retained to handle this aspect of the project as it requires specialization.



Progressive Office Cabling


Founded in 1986, Progressive Office’s success has been a direct result of years of commitment to seeking solutions on behalf of our clients in the Washington, D.C. and New York City areas. Efficiently working together, Progressive teams get cabling installed and operating as fast as possible while minimizing disruption and downtime. Call our toll free number (800) 614-4560 today.

Structured Cabling,Washington DC New York City

Basics of Riser Cables

6 Mar 2015

Structured Cabling,Network Cabling Data Cabling Riser cables were designed for non-plenum vertical applications like between the floors of multi-story buildings. They are also described as backbone cables. These cables serve as the main conduit of a distribution system for data, video or voice. It originates from the point where communications go in through a particular edifice.  This cable comprises part of the structure backbone. Other components of this facility are the cable corridors, telecommunications cabinets, equipment rooms, correlated hardware, and support facilities. This cable variety must be fire resistant in accordance with electrical codes. Nonetheless, specifications are not as stringent compared to plenum cables.



Understand its Uses


Riser cables may be used for different forms of data communications which also includes CCTV video access. It is ideal as well for voice communications. One major concern is that requirements vary for each service. Hat is why planning can sometimes be quite complicated. Building managers are often pressed to predict their requirements given limited time and expertise. Quite often they will recommend creating split riser systems for multiple applications which follow parallel routes through the corridors, closets, and equipment areas.



How do you select the medium?


Perhaps, the primary concern is to stay within budget.  You can expect system designers to resort to trade-offs in delivering a broad assortment of services within the backbone system. Other factors that may influence their design are the following:




  • Provide an adaptable medium in relation to supported services

  • Identify the necessary useful life span of backbone cabling

  • Consider the technical needs of users


Standards are on hand to serve as a guide in the design of riser cable systems. There are appropriate benchmarks for optical and copper cable backbone structures. Some of the backbone cable categories include:




  • Copper-shielded and unshielded twisted-pair or UTP cables

  • Coaxial and twin axial cabling configurations

  • Single mode and micron multimode optical fibers


Physical locations supporting riser cables take into consideration the telecommunications service entrances and adjacent equipment rooms containing the main cross-connect. This can extend to the telecommunications closets that serve a particular location, intermediate cross-connects that serve a number of telecommunications closets, or horizontal cross-connects for a remote telecommunications closet or just one level of the building. The telecommunications cabinet is the point of interaction between backbone systems and parallel (same floor) wiring.


Riser cable systems in multiple-story buildings need to pass through equivalent closets making use of connecting conduits between the floors. Said design provides each floor access to the backbone and allows circuits to be distributed to all levels. The conduit and sleeves should go higher than the floor level by at least an inch and fitted with fire-stopping material. These should also adhere to electrical codes. The riser or backbone cable system essentially acts as the core of telecommunications infrastructure.


 
Network Cabling, Data Cabling

Choosing Plenum Cables for Plenum Space

5 Sep 2014

Office Cabling Network Cabling, New York City The plenum space is described as that section of the building that makes possible air movement for HVAC systems. It also provides the space for conduits of heated, conditioned and return air circulation. The distance between the structural ceiling and dropped ceiling tiles is regarded as the plenum space.


The plenum space houses communication cables for telephone and computer networks. However, increasing neglect of cables in plenum areas create a major risk in case of fire.

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Cabling, Installations, Network Cabling

Cat6 Installation Tips

9 Jan 2013
 Data Cabling, Cat5e Cat6/6a CablingAlways study and document the required cabling layout and the distances between the equipment to be cabled before starting a Cat6 cable installation.

Refer to ANSI/TIA/ EIA 606 Document for color coding the different functions used in the system guidance. Use either PVC or plenum cable as required depending on where the cables are run. Fiber optic and/or copper cable may be required depending on the transmission speed and type of equipment.
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International Cooperating Ministries – Cabling Project Notes

20 Aug 2012

Project Objectives and Details based on site survey by Richard Elbe


Number of Drops: 110 total cable drops

  • 47 double network drops

  • 1 single network drop

  • 3 network printer drops

  • 3 media box wallplates with (2 HDMI, 2 VGA and 3 RCA Jacks)


Ceiling: Non-plenum, separate ducting allows for Cat6 PVC cable rather than the more expensive plenum cable.

Racks: 6' x 19" Relay Rack

Switches: Five 24,port Netgear Gigabit switches that will leave room for 4 ports per switch for future expansion of the network.
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Network Cat5 Cat6

Drop or Dropped Ceiling

23 Dec 2009
 Network Cat5 ,Cat6A drop or dropped ceiling is the ceiling that is hung below the main (structural) ceiling. It may also be referred to as a false or suspended ceiling, and is a staple of modern construction and architecture. The area above the dropped ceiling is called the plenum space, as it is usually used for the HVAC air return. The plenum space is also very commonly used to conceal piping, wiring, and ductwork.

A typical dropped ceiling consists of a grid-work of metal channels in the shape of an upside-down "T", suspended from wires from the overhead concrete structure. These channels snap together in a pattern – typically a 2' x 2' or 2' x 4' grid. Each cell is filled with a lightweight "tile" or "panel" which simply drop into the grid. Tiles can be selected from a variety of materials, including wood, metal, plastic, or mineral fibres, and can come in almost any color. Light fixtures, HVAC air grilles, and other fixtures are available which can fit the same space as a tile. Most tile material is easily cut to allow fixtures in other shapes, such as incandescent lights, speakers, and fire sprinkler heads.

The suspended ceiling was originally developed to conceal the underside of the floor above and to offer acoustic balance and control in a room. The acoustic performance of suspended ceilings has improved dramatically over the years, with enhanced sound absorption and attenuation. This is sometimes achieved by adding insulation known as Sound Attenuation Batts (SABs), more commonly referred to as "sound batts", above the panels to help deaden sounds and keep adjacent rooms quieter.