network cabling,Cat6a Cabling in Atlanta

All About Cat6a Cable

11 Feb 2013

Cat6a Cabling in AtlantaIt was once thought that copper cabling would never support speeds above 1 Gig, but Augmented Category 6, or Cat6a - has proven that wrong. Copper still lives and copper cabling may still be around at 40 Gig.


There has been much debate about which is the better option for supporting 10 Gig: Cat6a Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP)  or Cat6a Shielded Twisted Pair (STP)?  Both solutions have their uses, and some key information can help installers make informed decisions.



Standards and Alien Crosstalk


The IEEE released the 802.3an 10GBASE-T standard in June of 2006, which specifies 10Gbs data transmission over four-pair copper cabling. The Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) then began work on transmission performance specifications for the cabling. They published TIA Standard 568-B.2-10: Transmission Performance Specifications for 4-Pair 100 Ohm Augmented Category 6 Cabling in February 2008.


The new Cat6a standard extends the frequency of Cat6a cables to 500 MHz with specifications for a new performance parameter called Alien Crosstalk (ANEXT). Cat6a cables are fully backward compatible with all previous categories, including Cat6 and 5e. NEXT is crosstalk that occurs between adjacent cables and connecting hardware. The higher frequency signals of Cat6a makes ANEXT the limiting noise source for Cat6 and Cat5e systems.



Cat6a UTP vs. STP


Due to its ease of installation and familiarity among installers, Cat 6A UTP is today’s cabling of choice as it can support future bandwidth needs and 10Gb/s performance. In addition, the shield n the STP cable helps prevents electromagnetic and radiofrequency interference (EMI/RFI) on twisted pairs, helping eliminate the effects of noise from sources like machinery, generators, or medical imaging equipment, making STP systems the  choice for industrial and healthcare facilities.


As most residential systems are not faced with EMI/RFI challenges, so UTP is still the recommended cabling type for home installations.

Cat5 ,Cat6 data cables

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Cabling Lessons Learned

14 Dec 2012

Cat5, Cat6 data cables ,connected to serversA magnetic field when running low voltages. Unfortunately, when this unshielded cabling creates a magnetic field created. Any electrical cabling bear by disrupts communication, slowing transmission or preventing Network cabling is a tricky. Even with a solid background, technicians without adequate knowledge and training can make mistakes that may shut down an entire system. Here are some typical mistakes seen in network cabling.


Plan for the Future.  Cat5 may be the cheaper option, but can cause problems when upgrading is needed. Install Cat5e or Cat6 cables with options for upgrades to save labor costs.


Don’t Mix and Match. Twisted pair cabling was often out of the price range for many companies, so priority was given to data, while voice had with cheaper cabling. Now, VoIP has made voice equal to data in importance and need. Fortunately, a typical VoIP phone has a built-in Ethernet connection or pass-thru that is compatible with almost any data cable, which decreases installation costs.


Don't put Electrical Cables Next to Data Cables. Data cables use twisted pairs of wires inside that help produce transmissions altogether. This generally happens when the cables are running parallel, so if your cable is near a power line, lay them perpendicular to the power line.


 Not Laying New Cable When You Need To. Ethernet switches are convenient, but can be misused. Mini-switches are often added to provide a few extra ports; but this can cause bottlenecks and instability. Add extra cable instead, if more network resources are needed.


Forgetting Cable Management. “Ladder racks” add extra cost to an installation, but they also make the installation look better, run better, and easier to maintain and update. Also, don't forget to color code or label your cables, so technicians can actually find the right cable later.