Network Cabling, Data Cabling , cable tray

Uses And Benefits Of Cable Trays

25 Jun 2014

 Network Cabling, Data Cabling, cable traysThe cable tray is meant to prop up insulated cables for communication and power distribution. Cables are mounted on the tray, rather than placed inside a pipe. It can be likened to the structural cog of the building’s electrical layout, as it protects the cables both inside and outside. Wires are organized properly so wire maintenance is easier.


A cable tray facilitates the process of tracking down where wires come from for repairs, and also creates effective fire sealing between wall panels.

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Network Cabling Data Cabling

Distinguishing between Cat5 and Cat6 Network Cables

12 Jun 2014

Network cablesCAT 5,Network Cabling Data Cabling connect and transmit information between personal computers, storage area networks and routers. You can now find various models of cables. Your choice may depend on configuration and topology of the system’s architecture. The most common variety is known as twisted pair cable in local area networks. Numerous Ethernet networks use this type of cable. It is composed of four pairs of fine wires or conductors. Each pair is entwined several times to prevent obstruction from other cables and devices.


The CAT5 or Category5 is an example of twisted pair cable

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Network Cabling, Data Cabling ,Cat5e ,Cat6/6a Cabling

RJ-45 Connectors Made Easy

18 Apr 2013
 Network Cabling, Data Cabling ,Cat5e, Cat6/6a CablingWhat is the difference between a Cat5 and a Cat6 RJ45 connector?

The easy answer is:  they are both cable connectors with a standard network plug and socket, often called an “Ethernet jack”.

Cat 5 and Cat 6 are UTP, or Unshielded Twisted Pair cables.  The difference defines the cables as Category (Cat) 5 or Cat 6 UTP cable. Both are terminated by RJ45 connectors.
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Network Cabling ,Data Cabling

What is “Alien Crosstalk”?

8 Mar 2013

 Network Cabling, Data CablingNo, it’s not ET calling home. “Alien Crosstalk” is defined as “unwanted signal coupling from one balanced twisted-pair component, channel, or permanent link to another”.


Alien crosstalk is not generally affected by common noise from motors, transformers, or florescent lighting fixtures. Alien crosstalk is specified as “a parameter for cabling to approximate the energy present when all cabling pairs are energized”.

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network cabling,Cat6a Cabling in Atlanta

All About Cat6a Cable

11 Feb 2013

Cat6a Cabling in AtlantaIt was once thought that copper cabling would never support speeds above 1 Gig, but Augmented Category 6, or Cat6a - has proven that wrong. Copper still lives and copper cabling may still be around at 40 Gig.


There has been much debate about which is the better option for supporting 10 Gig: Cat6a Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP)  or Cat6a Shielded Twisted Pair (STP)?  Both solutions have their uses, and some key information can help installers make informed decisions.



Standards and Alien Crosstalk


The IEEE released the 802.3an 10GBASE-T standard in June of 2006, which specifies 10Gbs data transmission over four-pair copper cabling. The Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) then began work on transmission performance specifications for the cabling. They published TIA Standard 568-B.2-10: Transmission Performance Specifications for 4-Pair 100 Ohm Augmented Category 6 Cabling in February 2008.


The new Cat6a standard extends the frequency of Cat6a cables to 500 MHz with specifications for a new performance parameter called Alien Crosstalk (ANEXT). Cat6a cables are fully backward compatible with all previous categories, including Cat6 and 5e. NEXT is crosstalk that occurs between adjacent cables and connecting hardware. The higher frequency signals of Cat6a makes ANEXT the limiting noise source for Cat6 and Cat5e systems.



Cat6a UTP vs. STP


Due to its ease of installation and familiarity among installers, Cat 6A UTP is today’s cabling of choice as it can support future bandwidth needs and 10Gb/s performance. In addition, the shield n the STP cable helps prevents electromagnetic and radiofrequency interference (EMI/RFI) on twisted pairs, helping eliminate the effects of noise from sources like machinery, generators, or medical imaging equipment, making STP systems the  choice for industrial and healthcare facilities.


As most residential systems are not faced with EMI/RFI challenges, so UTP is still the recommended cabling type for home installations.

Cabling, Installations, Network Cabling

Cat6 Installation Tips

9 Jan 2013
 Data Cabling, Cat5e Cat6/6a CablingAlways study and document the required cabling layout and the distances between the equipment to be cabled before starting a Cat6 cable installation.

Refer to ANSI/TIA/ EIA 606 Document for color coding the different functions used in the system guidance. Use either PVC or plenum cable as required depending on where the cables are run. Fiber optic and/or copper cable may be required depending on the transmission speed and type of equipment.
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Network Cabling,data cabling,,DC

Network Cabling Issues

4 Jan 2013

Cat5 ,Cat6 ,lan cableGiven that labor costs for installation are much higher than the material cost for cable; your first requirement is to use the highest grade cable available. Cat5e is the most common, but Cat6 is becoming the standard as it is rated for a higher frequency signal, a somewhat higher cable quality, and has tighter specifications for noise and crosstalk. Both Cat5e  and Cat6 can handle gigabit speeds.


Both Cat5e and Cat6 use 10BaseT “twisted-pair” cabling, because it is ideal for either small, medium, or large networks that need flexibility and the capacity to expand as the number of network users grow.  In a twisted-pair network, each PC has a twisted-pair cable that runs to a centralized hub. Twisted-pair is generally more reliable than thin coax networks because the hub is capable of correcting data errors and improving the network's overall transmission speed and reliability. Also known as “up linking” hubs, they can be chained together for even greater expansion.


Should you install the cabling yourself, or hire a contractor? The smaller the office network, the more tempting it is to install cabling in-house. While this will save installation costs, it is important to be sure that all the cabling is installed and tested to professional standards. If your network encompasses multiple rooms-and/or floors, then hiring a professional cable installer that has experience with data communications networks is the safest and most practical route.  General electricians may not be familiar with all the requirements. Experienced cable installers such as Progressive Cabling will know the right grades of cables and connectors and have the knowledge and equipment to install and test a cabling system.

Cabling Network Cable Twisted Pairs

Cat5, 6 and 7 – What the Numbers Mean

2 Jan 2013

Category 6 Network Cable Twisted PairsCategory (Cat)5, 5e, 6 and 7 are different standards for cables used to transmit data through networks. All are twisted copper cables. The difference is based on their performance level.


Cat5 has become the world standard for connecting Ethernet devices. It is inexpensive and very effective; making it the most commonly used cable for connecting Ethernet devices. There are  two types, the Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP), and the Screened Twisted Pair (SCTP).  SCTP adds a protective covering to protect against interference.  Cat5 is ideal For long distance communications as it is rigid and has the capacity to support 10-100 Mbps and 100MHz.
The gradual shift from standard 10/100 networks to gigabit networks has challenged Cat5 as it  cannot support high speeds. This led to an upgraded version, Cat5e.


Cat5e was developed to makeCat5 compatible with gigabit networks and provide extra protection from interference. However Cat5e does not completely remove interference, which results in slow and often poor performance, but Cat5e does makes networks more reliable and faster.

Cat6 is more advanced than Cat5 and Cat5e.  Like Cat 5 and 5e, it uses 4 twisted pairs of copper cables, but with much better performance. The difference comes from a longitudinal separator that keeps all 4 wires separate from one another, reducing interference or “cross talk”, and a faster rate of data transfer.  Cat6 can be used in any network that employed Cat5 and Cat5e. Cat 6 is the next level standard for Ethernet connection.

Cat7 is the next generation cabling device for Ethernet connections. It improves internal signaling and exterior protection over Cat5 and Cat6 and can support 10gigabit connections  adaptable to standard Ethernet connectors.

IT support, network infrastructure

What is “Structured Cabling”?

27 Dec 2012

data cabling,structured network cables Traditionally computer network designers developed their systems with the assumption that they will operate on a specific type of cable using a specific type of connector. Thus, each manufacturer has its own cable and connector "standard," but that standard was for their own system only. For example, here are some “standard” cable/connector systems in use:

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Cat5 Cat6 Network Cabling,Washington DC

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Cabling Lessons Learned

14 Dec 2012

Cat5, Cat6 data cables ,connected to serversA magnetic field when running low voltages. Unfortunately, when this unshielded cabling creates a magnetic field created. Any electrical cabling bear by disrupts communication, slowing transmission or preventing Network cabling is a tricky. Even with a solid background, technicians without adequate knowledge and training can make mistakes that may shut down an entire system. Here are some typical mistakes seen in network cabling.


Plan for the Future.  Cat5 may be the cheaper option, but can cause problems when upgrading is needed. Install Cat5e or Cat6 cables with options for upgrades to save labor costs.


Don’t Mix and Match. Twisted pair cabling was often out of the price range for many companies, so priority was given to data, while voice had with cheaper cabling. Now, VoIP has made voice equal to data in importance and need. Fortunately, a typical VoIP phone has a built-in Ethernet connection or pass-thru that is compatible with almost any data cable, which decreases installation costs.


Don't put Electrical Cables Next to Data Cables. Data cables use twisted pairs of wires inside that help produce transmissions altogether. This generally happens when the cables are running parallel, so if your cable is near a power line, lay them perpendicular to the power line.


 Not Laying New Cable When You Need To. Ethernet switches are convenient, but can be misused. Mini-switches are often added to provide a few extra ports; but this can cause bottlenecks and instability. Add extra cable instead, if more network resources are needed.


Forgetting Cable Management. “Ladder racks” add extra cost to an installation, but they also make the installation look better, run better, and easier to maintain and update. Also, don't forget to color code or label your cables, so technicians can actually find the right cable later.