Structured cabling,Network Cabling, Washinton DC

Data Center Cabling Best Practices – Part 3

5 Jun 2017

cable management,Network Cabling,New York CityAs mentioned previously, modern data centers must be flexible, scalable, reliable, and manageable, making best practices required. Part 3 will cover Color Identification and Naming Scheme.



Color Identification


A method of fast visual identification, color coding makes management simpler, conserving time spent on the tracing of cables. Patch panel ports can also be coded, and various colored jacks and inserts are also coded. As determined by a particular manufacturer’s own color scheme, cables are available in numerous colors, each of which can be made applicable to the specific function of a cable or connection type.


Color schemes are expandable through the use of color bands at the end of every cable, using various colored sleeves and colored ports on the patch panel. However, it will also be necessary to use a secondary non-color scheme to make it possible for those who are color blind to identify the cables.



Naming Schemes


After determining the physical layout for the cabling that will be used, use a naming scheme that can be logically applied for facilitating fast and effortless identification of every cable component. Labeling can be an especially effective way to improve team communication among staff members because it makes confusion and uncertainty unlikely when a colleague must search for a particular component. Clear labeling is integral to the success of the naming scheme, and it should not be neglected.


A good naming scheme documents and labels every cable component. The following is the typical hierarchy for a naming scheme: Building, Room, Rack, Patch Panel, Workstation Outlet, Port, and Cable. Each should receive a designation indicating its location preceded by the area(s) above it. For example, Rack A03 would receive the designation SJ01-5D11-A03, if Room is designated SJ01-5D11, and Building is designated SJ01.


Upon the approval of the naming scheme, your team can begin labeling components. The team should prioritize drafting a manual that details the naming scheme and include it as part of the training program for newly hired data center administrators.


The Best Practices for Cable Component Selection will be discussed in the next series.



Union Network Cabling


When your work requires a unionized cabling group, call on Progressive Office Inc. for your commercial Cat5e/6/6a and fiber cabling projects. Specializing in cabling for data, voice, security and even the latest WiFi and LiFi solutions. Phone: (202) 462-4290

Network Cabling ,Data Cabling, Cat5e ,Cat6/6a Cabling

Reviewing Tools for Cabling Installation

30 May 2015

 Network Cabling, Data Cabling, Cat5e,Cat6/6a CablingCabling installation requires a lot of expertise. This is important due to the complexity of networks cables for data and communication services.  There are tools installers use to install and test cables. Some of the instruments include carts and caddies.



Basic Implements


Network carts and caddies hold cable spools for easier pulling. Reels can be set up on the wire cart which can hold 500 and 1000 foot reels. Cables are mounted on bars that slip through bored holes on the mounting framework. The cart contains a large, wide base that prevents tipping when you pull the cable.  Wire caddies secure smaller cable spools which come in lengths of 500 feet or less. And it has dividers that prevent the wires from becoming crisscrossed and twisteded.



Termination Tools


The appropriate termination tool increases productivity. It allows installation and termination of Cat5e and Cat6 jacks onto the connectors on a patch panel.


This "punch down tool" ensures accuracy and consistency. There are three categories: manual, impact and multi-wire. Cable installers can opt for a manual but most consider the impact tool to be the best option.


The fundamental impact instrument is fitted with a spring-loaded head which can be triggered by the installer. Not much force is needed. The spring is released automatically after being compressed. Modern multi-wire tools like the Jack Rapid punch down tool can terminate jacks eight times faster.


You can use several interchangeable blades for various impact tools. However, this depends on your cabling system. The advantages of this tool are its speed, user-friendliness and uniformity of termination. Sophisticated models consist of fixed blades that cut off leftover wire instantly instead of having to use wire cutters. These new products include a handle that is easy to hold, a disposable blade head and fixed band that holds the jack in place.



Other Useful Tools


You might need professional shears to ensure a quick, clean, and accurate cut.  Each job requires cutting of cables and trimming of excess wires.  A premium cable stripper guarantees immediate and hassle-free elimination of exterior insulation from multi-core cables, unshielded twisted as well as shielded twisted pairs. The flexible depth gauge will give better results.  Refrain from using pocket knives or ordinary scissors because you will probably end up damaging the cable. Other functional tools for cable installation are can wrenches for demarcation point boxes; crimping pliers; knives for splicing cables; voltage detectors; modular plug crimpers for telephones; and, probe picks to detect loose or broken connections.


But if you prefer to have a profession all do it all for you, contact us!

Data Cabling Cat5e Cat6/6a Cabling

Punch Down Tools in Data Cabling

22 May 2015

 Data Cabling,Cat5e, Cat6/6a CablingPunch-down tools are important for terminating cables in Insulation Displacement Connector (IDC) connecting blocks, patch bays and terminal jacks. These reliable tools have been present for many years. However, manufacturers do not stop in developing accessibility and labor concerns.


Punching down is the term used for the physical force needed to pierce or take away the cable insulation while the connection is being made. These used to be simple screwdrivers which have evolved into modern gadgets designed with durable rubber, gripping curve and impact mechanisms that reduce the use of force for manual exertion.

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Is it Practical to Use Cat6 Cable?

26 Apr 2015

cat 6,structured cabling, Data CablingData volume has grown extensively. Also, the processing capacity to users continues to get grow. Specialists in data management forecast that information production will be 44 times larger in five years with enterprises needing to process and safeguard 80 percent of the new data.



Data Cables


For these reasons, you might need to become more familiar with different types of cabling. There is Category 5 (Cat5) cable but it is only capable of transmitting 1000 megabits data rate per second on an Ethernet network. Transfer of data demands are increasing due to new and more sophisticated applications. That is why many companies prefer to work with Category 6 (Cat6) cables. Cat6 has a maximum data transfer of 10,000 megabits per second. Cat6 is also backward compatible which means your Cat5 connectors will plug i and work (at the lower speeds).



Future Proofing


Cat6 infrastructure guarantees that your system will be relevant well into the future. This allows users to easily cope with any modifications, new features or technological developments. The Cat5 standard has been used for a long time. However, your enterprise needs adequate bandwidth to handle these continuing and future changes. It is not merely a possibility or “let's say” situation. It is to be anticipated as the online experience continues to progress.


Demand for Cat6 escalates as the world-wide web is now offering premium video streams, online applications, highly-responsive and media-heavy portals.  If you decide to upgrade to a more reliable network, consider Cat6 cables. It is fast becoming the new standard in this industry.



Downsides


Cat 6 is more costly compared to Cat5e cables. On average, we are finding that projects cost about 20-25% more. This is because you are not guaranteed full speed unless all the components operate at gigabit speed. So, you need Cat6 cable, connectors, patch panels and Gigabit switches too. If one part is not rated as gigabit, the network will run at Cat5e speeds. Call or contact us to help you make this decision.


Nevertheless, experts say Cat6 will sooner or later surpass Category 5e.  And the initial upfront costs will pay future productivity gains for many, many years to come.

 
Network Cabling Data Cabling Cat5e Cat6/6a Cabling

Cabling Tips for Security Cameras

12 Mar 2015

CablingNetwork Cabling, Data Cabling, Cat5e, Cat6/6a Cabling,security system is definitely not the showy part of any security system. Nevertheless, it is an essential component of the system. It may seem complicated. There are many considerations in choosing and installing cables to ensure that the security system functions properly. Cables basically provide power for camera installation and transmit signals going back to the digital video recorder (DVR).



Deciding on the Perfect Cabling


Find out whether the system is analog (alternating current frequency has been modified) or digital (electronic technology). Then, you can figure out the proper cable for installation of your security cameras. Or simply refer to the manufacturing specs on the camera system.


The second step is to determine if your camera is powered remotely or connected to a nearby power outlet. It may be necessary to combine power and video cables. Security power and video cables can run next to each other or within one cable jacket. This makes installation easier by pulling one instead of two separate wires.


Make sure to test the cable before you install the CCTV. Examine each cable at the DVR position just to make sure that the cables are working prior to installation.



Cabling Guidelines


Quite often security cameras require coaxial cables to send video from the camera to your recorder. With the RG59 type of coax cable, it is possible to position the camera up to 600 feet away. The RG6 coax cable, on the other hand, may be extended up to 1,000 feet. Cut the cable according to your preferred length but leave an extra service loop of 10 – 20 feet for future flexibility.



What are the steps to follow?



  • Make the necessary BNC connection on the cable. This is a small quick round connector primarily for coaxial cables.

  • Plug one end of the BNC cable to the camera and the other to your DVR.

  • Strip the shield of the power cable to expose the black and red wires. Then, remove the jacket (at least ¼ inch) from each wire.

  • Put the wires inside the terminal block at the end of the female power wire plait. It should be red on red wires and black on black wires. Tighten screws on the terminals. Plug the camera into the fitting at the side of the braid.

  • Attach wires directly to the positive and negative leads respectively in the power box. Red wire is for positive while black is for negative. This is applicable if you will connect the camera to a multiple camera power supply unit.

  • In case you will attach the camera to a single power unit, connect the male power wire braid as well as power supply to the tip of the tress.


Now, the installation is complete and you are ready to use the system.

 

 
cable,Data Cabling ,Cat5e, Cat6/6a Cabling

CAT5E/CAT6 Cable Repair & Patching Techniques

15 Aug 2014

Network Cabling,Crimp Tool , Data CablingNetwork cables are said to be the “arteries and veins” of the communications network. The cabled system is a highly consistent platform for setting up infrastructure since the connectivity is very reliable. It is also easy to troubleshoot. However, it is not really fail-safe. Cables can get warped and sometimes snagged in ceilings. The connectors can also get broken if they are pulled to hard at the wallplate.


It does not matter whether it is Cat5e or Cat6. Cat6 is considered a better choice although, for some, cost prohibitive. When you look at it,

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Network Cabling, Data Cabling

Bad Connectors will Kill your Network

3 Jul 2014

A client was having serious connectivity and network issues. It was a very small business with just a few computers. But as they were working, a couple of the machines were losing their connection to the Internet. The problems and symptoms had been going on for over a year. They would lose Internet connection and they figured out that if they unplugged and replugged the network cable that the connectivity would usually come back. But sometimes, they would have to unplug and plug a few times to get connected. As you could imagine, this was incredibly frustrating for them.


Fortunately, we found and fixed the problem very quickly.


When network connections are flaky we always first look at the cabling and then the hardware and software. And since this was a network-wide problem, we had a strong feeling that they either had a cabling issue or a bad network switch.















In Figure 1, we took a photo of the connector that was going into the modem/router. If you look closely, you can see that the sleeve ends just short of the connector. This is so wrong. The sleeve needs to go inside of the connector so that it provides support and strain-relief to the 4 twisted pairs of wires. The wires would get bent at 90 degrees which changes the impedance and properties of the signal. Figure 2 is the inside of one of the wallplates. As you can see, the wires are untwisted and then punched into the slots for each of the 4-pairs. But they are untwisted too much.There should be no slack in between the sleeve and the connections. So, again, this will greatly reduce the effectiveness of the data transmission.


All cable connections and wallplates were checked and fixed. We cut off the bad connectors and recrimped on new ones. And we reterminated the wallplate. Since then, they have had 100% uptime on the Internet Service.


Are you having network cabling issues? Call 202-462-4290 or click here to contact us.

Network Cabling, Data Cabling ,Cat5e ,Cat6/6a Cabling

RJ-45 Connectors Made Easy

18 Apr 2013
 Network Cabling, Data Cabling ,Cat5e, Cat6/6a CablingWhat is the difference between a Cat5 and a Cat6 RJ45 connector?

The easy answer is:  they are both cable connectors with a standard network plug and socket, often called an “Ethernet jack”.

Cat 5 and Cat 6 are UTP, or Unshielded Twisted Pair cables.  The difference defines the cables as Category (Cat) 5 or Cat 6 UTP cable. Both are terminated by RJ45 connectors.
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Network Cabling,data cabling,,DC

Cabling Issues

11 Apr 2013

data cabling,,DCOne of the most important things about cabling is to purchase cable not just for what you’re using now but for what you may run in the future.   A rule of thumb is to install the highest-grade cable that your budget allows.


The standard is Ethernet. That means there are two basic types of cables to use: copper Ethernet and fiber optic Ethernet. Copper Ethernet cabling is generally used to connect the data center equipment to the end-user, while fiber optic cabling is used to network the infrastructure and to

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