cables, cabling design,Structured Cabling

Basics and Benefits of Zone Cabling – Part 1

7 Dec 2017

cables, cabling design,Structured CablingTopology or zone cabling design starts with horizontal cables running from patch panels within the TR (telecommunications room) to connections in a ZE (zone enclosure). A ZE can be installed in a ceiling, on a wall or beneath a raised floor. Next, cables originating from ZE connecting blocks or outlets lead to telecommunications outlets inside the WA (work area), equipment outlets, or straight to BAS (building automation system) devices.


Keep in mind ZE connections are creating by modular outlets or punch down blocks. No active equipment is housed in the ZE. For zone cabling deployment, experts recommend installing zone enclosures within a floor space’s populated areas that have the greatest density.


The primary element of zone cabling design is allowing flexibility in client work spaces that enable efficient MACs (moves, adds, and changes). Studies have found that zone cabling can result in considerable savings as opposed to the traditional configuration of home run work area to TR cabling. This is attributable to the fact that MACs on a home run topology need a greater amount of cabling materials and installation time for implementation.


To illustrate the savings mentioned above, we can compare a home run cabling link to a zone cabling link. Both can support a WA outlet positioned 200 ft. from the TR. In this scenario, the ZE is already cabled from the TR with extra ports for supporting additional services and positioned 50 ft. from the WA outlet. Should a second cable be required for deployment, 200 ft. of additional cable will require pulling from the telecommunications room that is designed traditionally, but just 50 ft. will require pulling with a zone cabling design.


Other important benefits derived from the utilization of zone cabling designs are considerably decreased installation and disruption times, along with cable pulling savings of 75%, which will result in significantly improving ROI (return on investment).


Part 2 will continue discussing the basics and benefits of zone cabling.



Progressive Office Cabling


Founded in 1986, Progressive Office’s success has been a direct result of years of commitment to seeking solutions on behalf of our clients in the Washington, D.C. and New York City areas. Efficiently working together, Progressive teams get cabling installed and operating as fast as possible while minimizing disruption and downtime. Call our toll free number (800) 614-4560 today.

structured cable management

Structured Cabling’s Six Subsystems – Part 2

28 Aug 2017

structured cable management,DCAs mentioned in Part 1, a structured cabling system is a type of open network structure that can be used by data, telephony, access control, building automation, and other systems. Its advantages are operational flexibility and economy. Part 2 will describe each of structured cabling's six subsystems below.



The Six Subsystems


1. Entrance Facilities


Entrance facilities house the protection devices, network demarcation points, cables,  connecting hardware, and other equipment that connect to private network cabling or the access provider. Connections between the inside building and outside plant cabling are included.



2. Equipment Room


Featuring environment control, the centralized area for telecommunications equipment is typically more complex than a telecommunications room. Usually containing the main cross-connect, it may also house the horizontal and intermediate cross-connects.



3. Backbone Cabling


Backbone cabling provides the interconnections between entrance facilities, telecommunications rooms, equipment rooms, etc. Typically, backbone cabling is comprised of fiber optic cables, intermediate and main cross-connects, mechanical terminations, and patch cables utilized for backbone-to-backbone cross-connections.



4. Telecommunications Room


Housing the terminations of backbone and horizontal cables to connecting hardware with patch cords or jumpers, a telecommunications room may also house the intermediate cross connects or main cross connect for different portions of the backbone cabling system. This space is a controlled environment containing telecommunications equipment, connecting hardware, and splice closures.



5. Horizontal Cabling


Extending from the work area’s telecommunications information outlet to the telecommunications room, the horizontal Network Cabling consists of horizontal cables and mechanical terminations, along with the jumpers and patch cords located in the telecommunications room. The system may also incorporate consolidation points and multi-user telecommunications outlet assemblies.



6. Work Area


The work area’s components typically extend from the telecommunications outlet/connector end of the horizontal cabling system to the work area equipment. At least two telecommunications outlets should be installed in every work area. If utilized, multi-user telecommunications outlet assemblies (MUTOAs) are a component of the work area.



Progressive Office Cabling


Founded in 1986, Progressive Office’s success has been a direct result of years of commitment to seeking solutions on behalf of their clients in the Washington, D.C. and New York City areas. Working together, their cabling teams get cabling installed and operating as fast as possible while minimizing disruption and downtime. Call their toll free number (800) 614-4560 today.

Structured cabling,Network Cabling, Washinton DC

Structured Cabling’s Six Subsystems – Part 1

22 Aug 2017

cable management,Network Cabling,Washinton DcA structured cabling system is a type of open network structure utilized by data, telephony, access control, building automation, and other systems. Its advantages are operational flexibility and economy. A structured cabling system is typically divided into these six subsystems: 1) Entrance Facilities, 2) Equipment Room, 3) Backbone Cabling, 4) Telecommunications Room, 5) Horizontal Cabling, and 6) Work Area.



Overview


Structured cabling is the design and installation of a cabling system that can provide support to several hardware use systems, and be suitable for both the needs of the present and the future.


Governed by international standards regarding the wiring of data centers, offices, and apartment buildings for data or voice communications, structured cabling design and installation utilizes several types of cable. These are typically CAT5e and CAT6, along with fiber optic cabling and modular connectors.


Defining methods and specifications for the laying of cabling in various topologies for meeting customer needs, standards typically require the use of a rack-mounted central patch panel from which modular connections can be used as required. Every outlet is then patched into a network switch for network usage or into a PBX (private branch exchange) or IP telephone system patch panel.


The use of color code patch panel cables is common for identifying the type of connection. However, it is not required by structured cabling standards with the exception of the demarcation wall field.


Cabling standards require that all eight conductors of CAT5e, CAT6, and CAT6A cable are connected to discourage "doubling-up" or the use of one cable for both data and voice. However, IP telephone systems are capable of running both telephone and the computer on the same wire.


When copper cabling, CAT5e, CAT6, or CAT6A is used, the maximum distance is 90 meters (98 yards) for the permanent link installation, along with an allowance of 10 meters (11 yards) for patch cords at the combined ends. Both CAT5e and CAT6 are capable of running Power over Ethernet (PoE) applications up to 90 meters. Due to power dissipation, CAT6A performs better and more efficiently.


Part 2 will summarize each of structured cabling's six subsystems.



Progressive Office Cabling


Founded in 1986, Progressive Office’s success has been a direct result of years of commitment to seeking solutions on behalf of their clients in the Washington, D.C. and New York City areas. Working together, their cabling teams get cabling installed and operating as fast as possible while minimizing disruption and downtime. Call their toll free number (800) 614-4560 today.

Structured Cabling, cables, Washington DC

Data Center Cabling Best Practices – Part 1

4 May 2017

Structured Cabling, Washington DC, New York CityModern data centers are equipped with devices and networking equipment that connect them. These devices demand increasingly greater bandwidth, and so their fiber or copper cabling must perform at a high level. Today’s data centers must be flexible, scalable, reliable, and manageable, making best practices required.



Planning the Infrastructure


Thus, documenting the existing and planned network, along with its equipment is needed. A flexible patching structure will permit the interconnection of devices at desired locations.



Structured Cabling


The structured approach of cabling revolves around the design of runs and connections that ease cable identification, maintenance, repair, and future expansion or reconfiguration. A Main Distribution Area (MDA) and Horizontal Distribution Area(s) (HDAs), along with two-post racks that permit improved access and cable management, will be needed.


MDA and HDA components must be of high quality and capable of bearing expected future loads. Their layout should have horizontal and vertical cable managers. The MDA contains primary cross-connects and core networking equipment. The HDA contains the cross-connects for the distribution of cables to Equipment Distribution Areas (EDAs). Patch cables will connect servers and storage by utilizing patch panels at their respective EDA.


Next, the equipment racks inside the data center must have their layout determined. A horizontal cabling configuration will be used for the distribution of cables from the HDA to the EDA. Flexible connectivity is required by a dynamic data center environment. The goal is the implementation of a system that transmits fiber channel, Ethernet, and other protocols.


Future port and application requirements will also need to be considered. Expansion and technological advances must be anticipated, so the installation of ports and cabling needed in the future should be done now to save on labor costs and downtime if upgrades are needed.



Structured Infrastructure Benefits



  • Cable identification and fault isolation simplified

  • Consistent cabling lays sound foundation for future

  • Future expansions and modifications made easier

  • Standard-compliant components from multiple vendors possible

  • Flexible connections provided


Cabling for Modular Data and High Density/High Port Count Fiber Equipment will be discussed in Part 2.



Union Network Cabling


When union work requires a unionized cabling group, call on Union Network Cabling for your commercial Cat5e/6/6a and fiber cabling projects. Specializing in cabling for data, voice, security and even the latest WiFi and LiFi solutions. Phone: (202) 462-4290

CAT 6a,network cabling, DC

Gradual Phase Out of CAT5e Cabling in Office Buildings

13 Mar 2017

Class E (CAT6), Network Cabling, DCAfter their Milan working group meeting in 2015 regarding cabling standards, the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), together known as the ISO/IEC, made the announcement that Category 5e (CAT5e) cabling will be considered obsolete for new installations in commercial and industrial buildings.


Setting the first international standard for cabling more than 20 years ago, ISO/IEC continually works on the development, maintenance, and promotion of technology and communications technical standards. A major change for the cabling of office buildings is now being implemented worldwide, raising the minimum horizontal cabling requirement from Class D (CAT5e) to Class E (CAT6), along with recommendations for installing Class EA (CAT6a) or faster cabling. Essentially, this will result in making CAT6 the minimum requirement for installations in new office building installations.


Providing a maximum performance of 100 MHz over computer networks, CAT5e has been utilized in structured cabling for both Ethernet and IP communications.  Considered adequate for fast Ethernet and gigabit Ethernet, CAT5e has the additional capability of carry video and telephony signals. The original ISO/IEC 11801 standard now has cabling classes that were added for enabling the support of up to 10 gigabits a second, such as CAT6, CAT6A, CAT7 and CAT7A.


CAT5 is not capable of matching the speed of data that CAT6 or CAT7 cabling can deliver. CAT6 has a maximum performance of 250 MHz, while CAT7 has a maximum performance of 600 MHz, enabling ultra-fast Ethernet. In addition, CAT7 features better durability and a longer service life than either CAT5 or CAT6 cabling.


More than 20 years have passed since ISO/IEC 11801 made its debut as an international standard, and it has led the way for the reliable implementation of data and voice cabling globally. However, CAT5e is now in the process of being phased out. Superior classes of cabling are being installed at new office buildings. Wireless LAN infrastructure is upgrading at a rapid pace, along with its speed, to keep up with the growing number of smartphones, laptops, and tablets. These demands have forced the gradual replacement of CAT5e with newer cabling that will meet current and future user expectations for fast and efficient data capability.



Union Network Cabling


When union work requires a unionized cabling group, contact Union Network Cabling for your commercial Cat5e/6/6a and fiber cabling projects. They specialize and excel in cabling for data, voice, security, and even the latest WiFi and LiFi solutions. Phone: (202) 462-4290

Data Cabling ,Network cabling, DC

Essential Components for Wired Networks

10 Apr 2015

Data Cabling ,Network cabling, DCBe sure to purchase the correct components before you install a wired network. The major components consist of the cable, router and network adapters.



Cables


You should opt for fast Ethernet or the 100 Base T cable. Ethernet (RJ-45) looks like telephone cables with somewhat thicker wire and jacks. It is also known as Cat 5e or Twisted Pair Ethernet with corresponding speed ratings of 10, 100, and 1,000. Every PC requires a separate network adapter.

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Network cabling, NetworkTopologies.

Essential Facts About Cabling System

14 Dec 2014

Network cabling, NetworkTopologies.Your office cabling system is costly and complicated investment. It's also a commitment to an office design and structure that is not easy to modify. If you add more workstations later, new cabling might be needed.


Most offices have a structured cabling topology that hardwires the cables from wallplate to patch panel. With this system, modifications are less likely because the initial installaiont includes a planning process that should anticipate some expansion. By pre-wiring potential locations in an existing or newly-constructed building, future moves, additions or alterations are avoided. You can just transfer patched cables in the wiring closet. Also, it is critical to number the wallplates to match the corresponding patch panel number. This will make it much easier to relocate a workstation or to troubleshoot a connectivity problem.



There are several sub-systems to consider:



  • The Demark refers to the point where the Internet Service Provider's (ISP) data line comes to an end and hooks up with the cabling in the building.

  • The equipment room serves as storage for all apparatus and wiring integration points.

  • Backbone cabling are high-speed cables (typically Cat6 or fiber) that connect various floors or wall closets.

  • The horizontal cabling for links up the network space to individual wallplates. These are done through conduits and ceiling spaces on every level.

  • The telecommunications enclosures are wall or floor mounted cages that hold the network equipment; primarily the patch panels ands switches but also sometimes the server and Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS) too.


Installation and design of structured cabling is regulated by standards that identify the following:



  • Network data switches

  • Offices layout for voice & data communications for Cat5e or Cat6 cable

  • Fiber Optic cables for backbones

  • Modular connectors at the wallplate


These components will guide the layout of cables in order to fulfill the data access requirements of your office. All of the cables start at the patch panel on a mounted rack (about 19 inches wide) in the wall closet. From there, they traverse through the drop ceiling and down the walls to individual wallplates. Quite often a wallplate will host 2 or more connections. At the wallplate a short patch cable, usually 7 to 14 feet in length wil connect the computer, phone, printer or other networked device.


All cabling standards require that all of the eight conductors in Cat5, Cat5e and Cat6 cables are inter-connected in a precise color-coded pattern. The network cable connects each device but some devices can share a single cable. This is true for VoIP phones. Most VoIP phones have a jack for the network cable and then a jack on the phone for connecting the computer. This pass-thru enables the two devices to share one connection.

Structured cabling,Network Cabling, Washinton DC

Continued Dominance of Structured Copper Cabling Systems

28 May 2014

Copper cablingNetwork Cabling ,Data Cabling,copper cabling system will remain dominant in the structured cabling systems industry. This conclusion is based on analysis and forecasts made by several cabling installation companies worldwide. Both copper and optic fiber cabling are used for key structured cabling systems applications like LAN, data centers, and Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP). Optic fiber is gradually gaining in popularity, but copper cable still seems to be the major preference of most companies.

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