Washington DC,Network Cabling, Data Cabling

Network Cabling Issues

31 Mar 2013
Network Cabling, Data Cabling ,Washington DCA major part of creating a viable network involves the installation of a cabling system. A solid cabling system is a good investment that will not only meet your current networking needs, but will last through your next-generation network as well.

Modern Ethernet networks follow a “star topology”, where each device on the network connects its own cable to a hub. In a single room
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IT Support,Data Cabling,Atlanta GA

A Guide to Network Cabling

22 Mar 2013

Cat 6While WI-Fi and other wireless network technologies have improved greatly over the years, nothing beats the reliability and performance of a wired network in your home or business. One challenge that people face is what kind of cable they need for their needs.


Although there are dozens of network cable types, the fact is only 3 types of network cable is commonly used in home and small business networks: Category 3 (Cat3), Category 5 (Cat5), and Category 6 (Cat6).

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Structured-Cabling,Data Cabling

What is “Structured Cabling”?

14 Mar 2013

Structured-CablingStructured cabling is a telecommunications cabling infrastructure consisting of a number of standardized smaller elements called subsystems.


Structured cabling falls into five subsystems:

  1. A Demarcation point is the connection point where the telephone company network ends and the customer’s on-premise wiring connection begins.

  2. Equipment or Telecommunications Rooms contain equipment and wiring points that serve the users inside a building.

  3. Vertical or Riser Cabling connects between the equipment/telecommunications rooms on different floors.
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Network cabling,Office Cabling in DC

Ethernet Wiring for Home Networking

1 Mar 2013

Network cabling,Office Cabling in DCAlthough “Wifi" is simpler for a lot of people, due to multimedia sharing, bandwidth on some  home networks, some users  really want a hard-wired home networking solution. A wired network allows a private, high speed, network at home for Internet access, file sharing, media streaming, online gaming (console or PC), IP security cameras, or other standard Ethernet type wiring use.


There are certain design considerations that need to be addressed based on needs.  Answering these questions will affect quantities, tools and materials needed.



The basic questions are:



  1. Which room(s) do I want wired?

  2. How many ports do I want in each location?

  3. What is a good location for distribution?

    If the internet comes over a cable into the house move the cable modem there so  it will be able to supply internet access to the entire network.  Another consideration is the amount of space needed to hold the network equipment.



  4. What path should the cables take?

    This is the most difficult consideration. For single floor homes the basement may be the best path. For multi-story homes you have to be creative. Outside may be an option or use an old laundry chute. The other consideration is cable length. The max cable length for up to gigabit speeds over copper UTP cabling is 100 meters (300 feet). This should be plenty for most home applications.



  5. What network speed do I need?

    This will determine what kind of switch to get. 10mbps is faster than most home internet connection.  If you just “surf” the internet, use a 10 megabit switch. If you are planning on sharing multimedia over the network 100 megabit switches are available and reasonably priced. If you must have the fastest, go with a Cat6 Gigabit cable.



Network Cabling,data cabling,,DC

Network Cabling Issues

4 Jan 2013

Cat5 ,Cat6 ,lan cableGiven that labor costs for installation are much higher than the material cost for cable; your first requirement is to use the highest grade cable available. Cat5e is the most common, but Cat6 is becoming the standard as it is rated for a higher frequency signal, a somewhat higher cable quality, and has tighter specifications for noise and crosstalk. Both Cat5e  and Cat6 can handle gigabit speeds.


Both Cat5e and Cat6 use 10BaseT “twisted-pair” cabling, because it is ideal for either small, medium, or large networks that need flexibility and the capacity to expand as the number of network users grow.  In a twisted-pair network, each PC has a twisted-pair cable that runs to a centralized hub. Twisted-pair is generally more reliable than thin coax networks because the hub is capable of correcting data errors and improving the network's overall transmission speed and reliability. Also known as “up linking” hubs, they can be chained together for even greater expansion.


Should you install the cabling yourself, or hire a contractor? The smaller the office network, the more tempting it is to install cabling in-house. While this will save installation costs, it is important to be sure that all the cabling is installed and tested to professional standards. If your network encompasses multiple rooms-and/or floors, then hiring a professional cable installer that has experience with data communications networks is the safest and most practical route.  General electricians may not be familiar with all the requirements. Experienced cable installers such as Progressive Cabling will know the right grades of cables and connectors and have the knowledge and equipment to install and test a cabling system.

Office Cabling, Network Cabling

Awareness Lacking on Smart Grids

21 Dec 2012

 Office Cabling, Network CablingResults from a collaborative research study by the Continental Automated Buildings Association (CABA) has found that the concept of a “connected home” provides great benefits in terms of controllability, energy saving and security for homeowners. However, it also found a lack of awareness and also confusion regarding what products and services are best suited for consumers, and the lack of defined cost benefits are key issues that have kept the industry from moving forward.


Only 39% of consumers had even a small level of understanding of what is a “smart grid” is, or any awareness of “smart” and “green” home technology possibilities. Of the consumers who had even a general awareness of smart grids, only 34% attribute this awareness to marketing campaigns by local utilities. Yet, energy efficiency will be the major concern for homeowners in the near future; and demands for reduced expenses and connected, energy saving products and services will increase. The need for manufacturers and utilities to team with telecommunication companies is obvious, as consumers will anticipate and expect these technologies to provide solutions in the near future.


A number of world-class companies and organizations, including Comcast Communications, Consolidated Edison of New York, IBM, Microsoft, Samsung Telecommunications America, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Southern California Edison, and Qualcomm, among others, have teamed to support this project. Their research determined the potentials of connected home technologies and strategies that companies can adopt to capitalize on the emerging “smart grid” in North America.

Cat5 ,Cat6 data cables

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Cabling Lessons Learned

14 Dec 2012

Cat5, Cat6 data cables ,connected to serversA magnetic field when running low voltages. Unfortunately, when this unshielded cabling creates a magnetic field created. Any electrical cabling bear by disrupts communication, slowing transmission or preventing Network cabling is a tricky. Even with a solid background, technicians without adequate knowledge and training can make mistakes that may shut down an entire system. Here are some typical mistakes seen in network cabling.


Plan for the Future.  Cat5 may be the cheaper option, but can cause problems when upgrading is needed. Install Cat5e or Cat6 cables with options for upgrades to save labor costs.


Don’t Mix and Match. Twisted pair cabling was often out of the price range for many companies, so priority was given to data, while voice had with cheaper cabling. Now, VoIP has made voice equal to data in importance and need. Fortunately, a typical VoIP phone has a built-in Ethernet connection or pass-thru that is compatible with almost any data cable, which decreases installation costs.


Don't put Electrical Cables Next to Data Cables. Data cables use twisted pairs of wires inside that help produce transmissions altogether. This generally happens when the cables are running parallel, so if your cable is near a power line, lay them perpendicular to the power line.


 Not Laying New Cable When You Need To. Ethernet switches are convenient, but can be misused. Mini-switches are often added to provide a few extra ports; but this can cause bottlenecks and instability. Add extra cable instead, if more network resources are needed.


Forgetting Cable Management. “Ladder racks” add extra cost to an installation, but they also make the installation look better, run better, and easier to maintain and update. Also, don't forget to color code or label your cables, so technicians can actually find the right cable later.

Network Cabling ,Washington DC

Network Cabling Repair Solutions

9 Feb 2011

Network Cabling, Washington DC   Installing network cabling in your business is one of the best decisions that you can make for increasing efficiency and improving customer service capabilities without increasing staff.  Employees connected to a network can often share information with co-workers and customers in a manner that is much faster and much safer than is possible with PCs that operate independently.


There is no doubt that a functioning computer network can give you a number of advantages when it comes to conducting business and servicing customers.  But serious problems with communication and security can arise though if there happens to be issues with your network cabling system.  A network cabling system that hasn’t been properly installed or that

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Network Cabling,Structured cabling, Washington DC

The Importance of Hiring a Professional for Your Office Networking

7 Feb 2011

Network Cabling,Structured cabling, Washington DCSmall office networking projects consisting of only a few PCs and additional pieces of equipment may seem like a reasonably easy undertaking, but even a small networking project shouldn’t be taken lightly.  The installation of new network cabling can have a number of advantages, but if the wrong materials are used or if the work is not properly performed, serious issues can arise in your business operations.


A consultation with a networking professional can shed some light on exactly what materials will be required for your networking job to achieve the best possible performance for the smallest investment.  In most cases a network specialist will also be able to complete the installation in a much shorter time than a private individual would be able to on their own.  This means that you’ll be able to

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Office Cabling, Network Cabling

Keeping Your Small Business Updated and Up-to-Date with Network Cabling

4 Feb 2011

 Office Cabling ,Network CablingIn the days before office networking was common, upgrading necessary software programs could be a monumental expense for an office with several PCs.  A small business owner with meager margins may have struggled to pay for the purchase of individual programs for every single PC in the office in order to make a full upgrade.


Many software manufacturers now offer licensing agreements for networks that is a much more cost effective option for initializing a complete office upgrade for an expensive program.  A licensing agreement can make it possible for a business owner to upgrade the software on a

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