Data Cabling,Network Cabling, Washington DC

Introduction to Network Cabling – Part 1

12 Jun 2017

 Data Cabling,Network Cabling, Washington DCCabling utilized for network infrastructure is a crucial aspect of networking, and it has grown in importance as new technologies are introduced, including virtualization, wireless access points, blade servers, network storage devices, etc.


Although wireless technology has greatly advanced, most of the existing computer networks are still using cables as the media for transferring data. Each standardized type of network cable is utilized for a specific purpose as discussed below.



Coaxial Cables


Patented in 1880 (yes, that long ago!), coaxial cable is most familiar as the cable that connects TV sets to their antennas and also as the standard for 10 Mbps Ethernet, which was common in the 1980s and early 1990s. During this time, networks utilized two coaxial cable types, thicknet, the 10BASE5 standard, or thinnet, the 10BASE2 standard. Composed of an inner copper wire surrounded by insulation and shielding, the stiff quality of these cables made them difficult to install and maintain.



Twisted Pair Cables


During the 1970s, Ethernet was developed at Xerox, which began collaborating with Intel and DEC for its standardization. The initial specifications, titled the Ethernet Blue Book or DIX from their three company initials, was published in 1980.


In the 1990s, twisted pair cables became the primary cabling standard of Ethernet, beginning at 10 Mbps with Category 3 or Cat3, which was followed by 100 Mbps Cat5 and Cat5e and up to 10 Gbps (10GBASE-T). Ranging up to eight wires wound together in pairs, this type of cabling is intended to minimize electromagnetic interference.


Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) and Shielded Twisted Pair (STP) are the two chief twisted pair cable types standardized by the industry. Due to lower manufacturing costs, modern Ethernet cables utilize UTP wiring. STP cabling is used by other types of networks like Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI). Clearly the most common network cable type globally, UTP cable is utilized for both networking and for the traditional telephone (UTP-CAT1) cabling.


UTP-CAT5e or Cat5e has become the most common UTP cable as it replaced coaxial cable, which was unable to cope with the increasing demand for networks that were faster and more reliable.


Part 2 will cover Fiber Optics, USB Cables, and Crossover Cables.



Union Network Cabling


When  your work requires a unionized cabling group, call on  Progressive Office Inc. for your commercial Cat5e/6/6a and fiber cabling projects. Specializing in cabling for data, voice, security and even the latest WiFi and LiFi solutions. Phone: (202) 462-4290

structured cabling,Washington DC New York City

Basics of Riser Cables

6 Mar 2015

Structured Cabling,Network Cabling Data Cabling Riser cables were designed for non-plenum vertical applications like between the floors of multi-story buildings. They are also described as backbone cables. These cables serve as the main conduit of a distribution system for data, video or voice. It originates from the point where communications go in through a particular edifice.  This cable comprises part of the structure backbone. Other components of this facility are the cable corridors, telecommunications cabinets, equipment rooms, correlated hardware, and support facilities. This cable variety must be fire resistant in accordance with electrical codes. Nonetheless, specifications are not as stringent compared to plenum cables.



Understand its Uses


Riser cables may be used for different forms of data communications which also includes CCTV video access. It is ideal as well for voice communications. One major concern is that requirements vary for each service. Hat is why planning can sometimes be quite complicated. Building managers are often pressed to predict their requirements given limited time and expertise. Quite often they will recommend creating split riser systems for multiple applications which follow parallel routes through the corridors, closets, and equipment areas.



How do you select the medium?


Perhaps, the primary concern is to stay within budget.  You can expect system designers to resort to trade-offs in delivering a broad assortment of services within the backbone system. Other factors that may influence their design are the following:




  • Provide an adaptable medium in relation to supported services

  • Identify the necessary useful life span of backbone cabling

  • Consider the technical needs of users


Standards are on hand to serve as a guide in the design of riser cable systems. There are appropriate benchmarks for optical and copper cable backbone structures. Some of the backbone cable categories include:




  • Copper-shielded and unshielded twisted-pair or UTP cables

  • Coaxial and twin axial cabling configurations

  • Single mode and micron multimode optical fibers


Physical locations supporting riser cables take into consideration the telecommunications service entrances and adjacent equipment rooms containing the main cross-connect. This can extend to the telecommunications closets that serve a particular location, intermediate cross-connects that serve a number of telecommunications closets, or horizontal cross-connects for a remote telecommunications closet or just one level of the building. The telecommunications cabinet is the point of interaction between backbone systems and parallel (same floor) wiring.


Riser cable systems in multiple-story buildings need to pass through equivalent closets making use of connecting conduits between the floors. Said design provides each floor access to the backbone and allows circuits to be distributed to all levels. The conduit and sleeves should go higher than the floor level by at least an inch and fitted with fire-stopping material. These should also adhere to electrical codes. The riser or backbone cable system essentially acts as the core of telecommunications infrastructure.