Data Cabling, Fiber optic cable

Fiber Optic Cabling for PC Networks

17 Apr 2015

 Data Cabling, Fiber optic cableIt is not easy to install fiber optic cables for computer networks. Fiber optic cabling components consist of the core, buffer, cladding, and jacket. Some cables also have copper conductors to provide power for repeaters. Nonetheless, installation should only be performed by experts. The first step is to determine the cable that you want to use. The second is to learn the procedures of fiber optic cable installation.



Varieties of Fiber Optic Cables


Multi-mode fiber optic cable is meant for short distances or a maximum of 1,800 feet. It can transfer 10 gigabits of data per second. The single-mode fiber optic cable costs more. Yet, it has the capacity to convey the same 10 gigabits up to 37 miles. The first option is recommended for residences and small offices since there is really no need to cover such long distances.


How do you begin an installation? Prepare the switches and devices for the office PCs as well as at the faceplate for your future fiber solution. Connect the computer cable to the outlet and hubs/routers to the desktop. Attach a fiber optic cable to the router and hook it up to the second computer (if there is one). The cable must not be too tight so you can unplug it without difficulty. Secure the cables properly. Rather than replacing the existing 10BaseT network card. Leave it installed and install a new separate fiber network adapter. That will help make the transition is smoother.


You will need a media converter for devices without fiber optic outlets. It transforms light pulses into low voltage data. Plug the computer into the network using a Universal Serial Bus (USB) adapter and an Ethernet cable. Connect the workstation without the fiber optic outlet into your converter. Now, you can turn on all apparatus linked to the network.



Upkeep Techniques


Minimal maintenance is required for household networks. Simply make sure that cables are not damaged or disconnected. Cables should be bundled neatly to prevent damage. Keep these out of the reach of youngsters and pets. Puppies love to chew cables! Fiber optic cable speeds can be degraded by dust, scratches and humidity. Try to buy a cheap laser pointer to check if your cables are functioning efficiently. Position the laser at one edge of the cable and find out if the other point lights up. If it lights, the cable conducts light well. Otherwise, it is time to clean or replace the fiber optic cable. Also check your outdoor cables often since they are more susceptible to damage.


Fiber optics provide much higher speed and clear data signals compared to conventional copper cabling. Indeed, fiber optics is a terrific solution if you need more speed to your Server or for your Internet apps. And even though the cost is quite high, you are assured of a high value for your investment.

Structured-Cabling,Data Cabling

Common Blunders to Avoid

7 Jan 2015

CableStructured-Cabling,Data Cabling,fiber-optics networking has evolved a great deal. It is now mandatory for companies to invest in structured cabling systems that can support a complex operation. That is why many corporations have shifted to fiber optic communications from the traditional copper cabling systems. However, it is important to plan the infrastructure carefully and anticipate some problems that may come along the way.



Replacement in Stages


Doing everything hastily and simultaneously is a problem.
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cable,Data Cabling ,Cat5e, Cat6/6a Cabling

CAT5E/CAT6 Cable Repair & Patching Techniques

15 Aug 2014

Network Cabling,Crimp Tool , Data CablingNetwork cables are said to be the “arteries and veins” of the communications network. The cabled system is a highly consistent platform for setting up infrastructure since the connectivity is very reliable. It is also easy to troubleshoot. However, it is not really fail-safe. Cables can get warped and sometimes snagged in ceilings. The connectors can also get broken if they are pulled to hard at the wallplate.


It does not matter whether it is Cat5e or Cat6. Cat6 is considered a better choice although, for some, cost prohibitive. When you look at it,

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Data Cabling,Structured Cabling,Washington DC

Advantages Of Hard-wired Cabling Over Wireless Networks For Database Applications

5 Jun 2014

 Network Cabling Data CablingCorporate organizations need to share information efficiently. There are two options for them when it comes to setting up database applications; it is a choice between hard-wired cabling and a wireless network. Wireless systems provide users with more mobility. However, the majority of enterprises prefer the wired model for more control, security, consistency and speed. These are the major upsides of going for physical connections. It is comparatively economical since the cost of cabling, even with the lengths needed to cover a standard office space, is generally cheap.

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Structured cabling,Network Cabling, Washinton DC

Continued Dominance of Structured Copper Cabling Systems

28 May 2014

Copper cablingNetwork Cabling ,Data Cabling,copper cabling system will remain dominant in the structured cabling systems industry. This conclusion is based on analysis and forecasts made by several cabling installation companies worldwide. Both copper and optic fiber cabling are used for key structured cabling systems applications like LAN, data centers, and Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP). Optic fiber is gradually gaining in popularity, but copper cable still seems to be the major preference of most companies.

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Data Cabling ,Cat5e ,Cat6/6a Cabling,Network Cable Rack

Upgrade Comparison: Cat6a vs. Cat7 vs. Fiber Cabling Analysis

10 Mar 2014

We were asked to bid on a cabling project that was fairly straight-forward. It involved replacing the existing Cat5e cable with either Cat6a, Cat7 or fiber cable. The site was an open, standard modern office with a drop ceiling and hollow office walls. The client needed 64 single drops to existing faceplates, three new 24-port patch panels and patch cables.


The need for higher speeds by the client was created by a demand for faster access to larger files from the Server. This potential client was involved with heavy drafting and multimedia applications that require more bandwidth through the cabling system. Cat5e yields up to 1000Base-T, 1-Gigabit, data transfer speed.


The challenge is in deciding on which type of cable to use. Cat6a and fiber are very standard solutions. But Cat7 is not  at all a standard installation yet (and might not ever be one). The problems with Cat7 are that the cable is very heavy,

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Network Cabling,data cabling,,DC

Cabling Issues

11 Apr 2013

data cabling,,DCOne of the most important things about cabling is to purchase cable not just for what you’re using now but for what you may run in the future.   A rule of thumb is to install the highest-grade cable that your budget allows.


The standard is Ethernet. That means there are two basic types of cables to use: copper Ethernet and fiber optic Ethernet. Copper Ethernet cabling is generally used to connect the data center equipment to the end-user, while fiber optic cabling is used to network the infrastructure and to

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Network cabling,Office Cabling in DC

Ethernet Wiring for Home Networking

1 Mar 2013

Network cabling,Office Cabling in DCAlthough “Wifi" is simpler for a lot of people, due to multimedia sharing, bandwidth on some  home networks, some users  really want a hard-wired home networking solution. A wired network allows a private, high speed, network at home for Internet access, file sharing, media streaming, online gaming (console or PC), IP security cameras, or other standard Ethernet type wiring use.


There are certain design considerations that need to be addressed based on needs.  Answering these questions will affect quantities, tools and materials needed.



The basic questions are:



  1. Which room(s) do I want wired?

  2. How many ports do I want in each location?

  3. What is a good location for distribution?

    If the internet comes over a cable into the house move the cable modem there so  it will be able to supply internet access to the entire network.  Another consideration is the amount of space needed to hold the network equipment.



  4. What path should the cables take?

    This is the most difficult consideration. For single floor homes the basement may be the best path. For multi-story homes you have to be creative. Outside may be an option or use an old laundry chute. The other consideration is cable length. The max cable length for up to gigabit speeds over copper UTP cabling is 100 meters (300 feet). This should be plenty for most home applications.



  5. What network speed do I need?

    This will determine what kind of switch to get. 10mbps is faster than most home internet connection.  If you just “surf” the internet, use a 10 megabit switch. If you are planning on sharing multimedia over the network 100 megabit switches are available and reasonably priced. If you must have the fastest, go with a Cat6 Gigabit cable.