Structured Cabling,Washington DC New York City

Important Considerations for Structured Cabling

13 Sep 2017

 cables,structured cabling, Network CablingAn infrastructure for enterprise communications, structured cabling is a system of hardware and cables designed for flexibility and future capability. Complying with the Electronic Industry Alliance/Telecommunications Industry Association (EIA/TIA), conventional structured cabling meets the organization’s standards internationally. The following are three important aspects of structured cabling that every organization should consider.



Savings


Over time, IT infrastructure has become more condensed and more sophisticated, and the importance of structured cabling has grown. Structured cabling eases a company’s expansion via a design that allows the adoption of additional hardware and software. As it has consistent network architecture, structured cabling allows the simplification of maintenance and repair, decreasing costs of upkeep. A study by the International Engineering Consortium discovered that standardizing cabling components and reducing cable delivery methods decreased startup construction outlay by almost a third. Moreover, expenses for network maintenance are lowered 40%.



Trends


Structured cabling is gradually making the transition from copper cabling to fiber optic because companies desire greater speed and better air circulation for the reduction of cooling costs. Lighter and narrower cables allow an overhead system of cabling to be installed instead of raised-floor cabling. The installation and management of cabling is made easier by less cumbersome cables, and so this trend will grow over time.



Planning


Sound planning is crucial for the success of IT projects. The future number of users, their locations, and required bandwidth must be diligently considered. How PoE (Power over Ethernet) will provide power to devices via must be studied. As Wi-Fi use grows, the number of wireless access points must be determined by every enterprise. Where will cables be located inside and outside the premises? Will the structured cabling be able to cope with moves and changes within the premises? Scalability and flexibility are both important, and so the locations of furniture and server racks must be carefully planned with respect to cabling. IT staff should also understand that different types of cable have limitations as to the length of their respective runs. Finally, there may be government regulations for structured cabling that require compliance.



Progressive Office Cabling


Founded in 1986, Progressive Office’s success has been a direct result of years of commitment to seeking solutions on behalf of their clients in the Washington, D.C. and New York City areas. Efficiently working together, their teams get cabling installed and operating as fast as possible while minimizing disruption and downtime. Call their toll free number (800) 614-4560 today.

structured cable management

Structured Cabling’s Six Subsystems – Part 2

28 Aug 2017

structured cable management,DCAs mentioned in Part 1, a structured cabling system is a type of open network structure that can be used by data, telephony, access control, building automation, and other systems. Its advantages are operational flexibility and economy. Part 2 will describe each of structured cabling's six subsystems below.



The Six Subsystems


1. Entrance Facilities


Entrance facilities house the protection devices, network demarcation points, cables,  connecting hardware, and other equipment that connect to private network cabling or the access provider. Connections between the inside building and outside plant cabling are included.



2. Equipment Room


Featuring environment control, the centralized area for telecommunications equipment is typically more complex than a telecommunications room. Usually containing the main cross-connect, it may also house the horizontal and intermediate cross-connects.



3. Backbone Cabling


Backbone cabling provides the interconnections between entrance facilities, telecommunications rooms, equipment rooms, etc. Typically, backbone cabling is comprised of fiber optic cables, intermediate and main cross-connects, mechanical terminations, and patch cables utilized for backbone-to-backbone cross-connections.



4. Telecommunications Room


Housing the terminations of backbone and horizontal cables to connecting hardware with patch cords or jumpers, a telecommunications room may also house the intermediate cross connects or main cross connect for different portions of the backbone cabling system. This space is a controlled environment containing telecommunications equipment, connecting hardware, and splice closures.



5. Horizontal Cabling


Extending from the work area’s telecommunications information outlet to the telecommunications room, the horizontal Network Cabling consists of horizontal cables and mechanical terminations, along with the jumpers and patch cords located in the telecommunications room. The system may also incorporate consolidation points and multi-user telecommunications outlet assemblies.



6. Work Area


The work area’s components typically extend from the telecommunications outlet/connector end of the horizontal cabling system to the work area equipment. At least two telecommunications outlets should be installed in every work area. If utilized, multi-user telecommunications outlet assemblies (MUTOAs) are a component of the work area.



Progressive Office Cabling


Founded in 1986, Progressive Office’s success has been a direct result of years of commitment to seeking solutions on behalf of their clients in the Washington, D.C. and New York City areas. Working together, their cabling teams get cabling installed and operating as fast as possible while minimizing disruption and downtime. Call their toll free number (800) 614-4560 today.

Cable Management,Cable Management ,Data Cabling ,Cat5e, Cat6/6a Cabling

Security Aspects of Structured Cabling – Part 1

11 Jul 2017
 

structured Cable Management/ BlogCabling system designed for the purpose of security have hardly changed the last decade and a half. Delivering video images and access control data to a control room utilizing standard transmission technology is basic and familiar. What has recently changed is the transition to IP-based security products and the rapid increase in business applications, resulting in end-users expecting a greater video, audio, and data integration. All of these items require delivery over one standardized structured cable system.


As opposed to traditional video and access control systems, voice and data communications cabling systems have had numerous transformations. Functioning on structured cable systems, data networks have shifted from the pioneering 1980s proprietary cabling to standards-based cabling using optical fiber and balanced twisted pair. This has resulted in greater transmission speeds and significantly increased network bandwidth. These two elements allow a security installer to achieve integration that is demanded by clients for CCTV, access control, and other applications. Through the adoption of standardized structured cabling, installers will be able to access new streams of revenue and provide tangible benefits to users by unifying all of their systems within one cabling infrastructure.


This change in the utilization and deployment of structured cabling systems was recognized by ANSI/TIA-862-B “Structured Cabling Infrastructure Standard for Intelligent Building Systems”, which was developed by the TIA TR-42.1 Commercial Building Cabling Subcommittee and released February 2016. This standard features the requirements of several standard and developing systems that are able to use the existing cabling of buildings. It also includes Distributed Building Services that do not utilize a building’s infrastructure cabling because of application, connector, historic, and topographic limitations.


A company’s network infrastructure is crucial in the distribution of information using electronic media, including CCTV, access control, data, and voice. Functioning over a structured cabling system, this distribution network is developed for the perpetual flow of data, featuring redundancy at the heart.  Installed with centralized topology, this enabled the most facile sharing of resources achievable, along with the greatest flexibility and expandability possible.


Part 2 will cover Structured Cabling Benefits for Your Business.



Network Cabling


When work requires a unionized cabling group, call on  Progressive Office Inc.,   for your commercial Cat5e/6/6a and fiber cabling projects. Specializing in cabling for data, voice, security and the latest WiFi and LiFi solutions. Phone: (202) 462-4290

structured cabling,Network Cabling,Washinton DC

Challenges and Planning of a Structured Cable System – Part 3

5 Jul 2017

 structured Cabling, Network Cabling, Washington DCAs previously discussed, the transition to IP-based security products and the rapid increase in business applications has resulted in end-users expecting greater video, audio, and data integration. These items require delivery over a standardized structured cable system. The following are the benefits offered by structured cabling for security systems. Part 3 will cover the Challenges and Planning of a Structured Cabling System.



Challenges


Typically, customers exploring the security market are advised that the only method for deploying a new access control system or an IP video surveillance system is through the removal of all current coaxial or UTP cable and then the installation of an entirely new Cat 5/6 structured cabling network.


Another method is much less disruptive and cheaper. It uses existing cable and employs an IP transmission system that is a hybrid. There are numerous hybrid transmission systems available that enable installers to make good use of extended Ethernet and PoE power distances through existing cable.



Planning


An effective, structured cabling system supports all the communication needs of a company with the integrated flexibility that enables users to link to CCTV cameras, VoIP telephones, access control points, and data devices. Planning a security system upgrade will include several crucial considerations as summarized below.




  • Applications: What will the system accommodate now as far as data, video, voice, and multimedia applications? What emerging technologies will be adapted in the future?

  • Service Lifetime: The service lifetime of a structured cabling system should be 15 to 20 years because it will be the spine of an organization’s communications network.

  • Compatibility: The applications that will function on the structured cabling system for the foreseeable future should be compatible with it.

  • Bandwidth: As bandwidth demand will usually increase because of business growth, a company must consider present and future demand.

  • Users: For the 15 to 20 year service lifetime of the structured cabling system, the estimated number of users during this period should determine the capacity required.

  • Modifications: Fiber-optic technologies are being developed rapidly, and the design of a structured cabling network should include flexibility in order to accommodate modifications and additional users.


Union Network Cabling


When union work requires a unionized cabling group, call on Union Network Cabling for your commercial Cat5e/6/6a and fiber cabling projects. Specializing in cabling for data, voice, security and the latest WiFi and LiFi solutions. Phone: (202) 462-4290

Network Cabling ,Data Cabling, Fiber-optic cable,New York City

Introduction to Network Cabling – Part 2

19 Jun 2017

data Cabling,Fiber optic , installationsAs mentioned in Part 1, cabling utilized for network infrastructure is a crucial aspect of networking, growing in importance as new technologies are introduced. Although wireless technology has made great advancements, existing computer networks are still using cables for transferring data. Part 2 will cover Fiber Optics, USB Cables, and Crossover Cables.



Fiber Optics


In contrast to older wiring, fiber optic network cables utilize strands of glass and pulses of light to carry data. Although composed of glass, these cables can be bent and have proven their utility in wide area network (WAN) installations in office buildings, especially when long distance runs are necessary and a high volume of communication traffic is typical.


The two main fiber optic cable standards are single mode, the 100BaseBX standard, and multimode, the 100BaseSX standard. Due to single mode's higher bandwidth capacity, it is typically used by long distance telecommunications networks. On the other hand, local networks commonly utilize multimode because of its lower cost.



USB Cables


USB (Universal Serial Bus) cables, which feature twisted pair wiring, are typically used to connect a peripheral device, such as a mouse, to a computer. Dongles or special network adapters also permit the indirect connection of an Ethernet cable to a USB port.



Serial & Parallel Cables


As numerous PCs during the 1980s and early 1990s did not have Ethernet capability, along with the fact USB did not yet exist, now obsolete serial and parallel interfaces were occasionally utilized for networking PCs together. As an example, null modem cables connected the serial ports of two PCs, allowing 0.115 to 0.45 Mbps data transfer.



Crossover Cables


A null modem cable belongs in the category of crossover cables because it joins two network devices of the identical type, like two network switches or two PCs. Ethernet crossover cable usage was most commonly found in home networks years ago when two PCs were directly connected. Currently the majority of home networks are equipped with routers featuring crossover capability, making crossover cables unnecessary.



Union Network Cabling


When union work requires a unionized cabling group, call on Union Network Cabling for your commercial Cat5e/6/6a and fiber cabling projects. Specializing in cabling for data, voice, security and even the latest WiFi and LiFi solutions. Phone: (202) 462-4290

Data Cabling,Network Cabling, Washington DC

Introduction to Network Cabling – Part 1

12 Jun 2017

 Data Cabling,Network Cabling, Washington DCCabling utilized for network infrastructure is a crucial aspect of networking, and it has grown in importance as new technologies are introduced, including virtualization, wireless access points, blade servers, network storage devices, etc.


Although wireless technology has greatly advanced, most of the existing computer networks are still using cables as the media for transferring data. Each standardized type of network cable is utilized for a specific purpose as discussed below.



Coaxial Cables


Patented in 1880 (yes, that long ago!), coaxial cable is most familiar as the cable that connects TV sets to their antennas and also as the standard for 10 Mbps Ethernet, which was common in the 1980s and early 1990s. During this time, networks utilized two coaxial cable types, thicknet, the 10BASE5 standard, or thinnet, the 10BASE2 standard. Composed of an inner copper wire surrounded by insulation and shielding, the stiff quality of these cables made them difficult to install and maintain.



Twisted Pair Cables


During the 1970s, Ethernet was developed at Xerox, which began collaborating with Intel and DEC for its standardization. The initial specifications, titled the Ethernet Blue Book or DIX from their three company initials, was published in 1980.


In the 1990s, twisted pair cables became the primary cabling standard of Ethernet, beginning at 10 Mbps with Category 3 or Cat3, which was followed by 100 Mbps Cat5 and Cat5e and up to 10 Gbps (10GBASE-T). Ranging up to eight wires wound together in pairs, this type of cabling is intended to minimize electromagnetic interference.


Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) and Shielded Twisted Pair (STP) are the two chief twisted pair cable types standardized by the industry. Due to lower manufacturing costs, modern Ethernet cables utilize UTP wiring. STP cabling is used by other types of networks like Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI). Clearly the most common network cable type globally, UTP cable is utilized for both networking and for the traditional telephone (UTP-CAT1) cabling.


UTP-CAT5e or Cat5e has become the most common UTP cable as it replaced coaxial cable, which was unable to cope with the increasing demand for networks that were faster and more reliable.


Part 2 will cover Fiber Optics, USB Cables, and Crossover Cables.



Union Network Cabling


When  your work requires a unionized cabling group, call on Progressive Office Inc. for your commercial Cat5e/6/6a and fiber cabling projects. Specializing in cabling for data, voice, security and even the latest WiFi and LiFi solutions. Phone: (202) 462-4290

IT Support,Data Cabling,Atlanta GA

The Organizations that Set Cabling Standards

27 May 2017

Data Cabling,Network Cabling,Atlanta GAThe TIA (Telecommunications Industry Association) and the ISO (International Organization for Standardization) are the primary organizations that oversee the development of structured cabling standards for the industry. Committees formed by the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) provide assistance through testing and setting performance specifications for various standards.


Compliance with standards ensures the functioning of systems at specified levels, backward compatibility, and a greater selection of equipment will exist. General global recognition of standards permit utilizing equipment sourced from various countries inside computer systems. Requirements for the components of optical and copper cabling including cables, assemblies, connectors, cabling spacing and pathways, administration, field testing, and installation are standardized to make worldwide acceptance possible.


Technicians in North America typically use TIA standards, while the rest of the world uses ISO standards. Examples of organizations that set regional and national standards organizations are CENELEC (European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization), CSA (Canadian Standards Association) and JSA (Japanese Standards Association). Their standards are generally compatible with TIA and ISO.


Different terminology used by TIA and ISO Associations sometimes cause confusion because they refer to the same item. For example, what the TIA terms as Cat5e is what ISO terms to be Class D. However, adherence to standards set by TIA and ISO ensure system cabling requirements are properly implemented in the categories below.




  • Insertion Loss – Decrease of signal strength down the transmission line.

  • Return Loss – Measurement of signal reflections on the cable.

  • NEXT – Near End Crosstalk Loss due to signal coupling.

  • Propagation Delay / Delay Skew – Elapsed time for signal to reach other end of cable or the delay between signal arrival at far end on slowest and fastest cable pairs.

  • ACR – Difference between insertion loss and NEXT.

  • ELFEXT – Identical to NEXT, but for cabling system’s far end.

  • PSANEXT / PSAACRF – Power sum alien crosstalk at near end / Power sum alien crosstalk at far end.


Due to ever-increasing data rates, the efforts of the standards organizations are assuming greater importance in terms of ensuring proper system design.



Union Network Cabling


When your work requires a unionized cabling group, call on  Progressive Office Inc. for your commercial Cat5e/6/6a and fiber cabling projects. Specializing in cabling for data, voice, security and even the latest WiFi and LiFi solutions. Phone: (202) 462-4290

Data Cabling, Cat5e Cat6/6a Cabling, Washington DC

New Standards for Cabling and Category 8 Update

20 May 2017

Data Cabling, Cat5e Cat6/6a Cabling, Washington DCThe selection of proper cabling has become more crucial and also more complicated, but the process can be made easier by knowing about the choices available and updates regarding the development of Category 8 (CAT 8).


There are several organizations that determine the standards for cabling, such as the ISO (International Organization for Standardization), IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission), TIA (Telecommunications Industry Association), and CENELEC (European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization). However, our discussion will primarily focus on ISO/IEC and TIA.


As its standard calls for 10Gb/s rates of transmission, 10GBASE-T cabling is the fastest in the market. Unable to support 10Gb/s, Category 5e does not receive 10GBASE-T standard recognition.  In addition, advisories by the TIA and ISO/IEC and TIA state that new class E/category 6 cabling should not be installed to support 10GBASE T. As a result, the cabling options for new installations that meet the 10GBASE-T standards for carrying data up to 100 meters are only found in the class EA/CAT 6A, class F/CAT 7, or class FA/CAT 7A.


Regarding data centers that are newly built, ISO, along with other standards organizations, have determined that CAT 6A should be the minimum grade. The task force overseeing IEEE 802.3 40GBASE-T have drafted the baseline objectives for the future 40 Gb/s standard, which is well beyond the capabilities of CAT 6A.


Cabling of a higher category traditionally matches and surpasses the electrical and mechanical standards of what preceded it. In addition, it is backwards compatible. Although TIA calls for cabling systems to perform at CAT 6A minimum, it will not be adopting CAT 7 or 7A as determined by ISO/IEC. TIA is naming its next class of cabling, Category 8, to differentiate it from ISO/IEC standards for CAT 7 and CAT 7A.


Interestingly, the proposed performance for CAT 8 will not be meeting or exceeding CAT 7A standards for up to 1 GHz. For example, regarding parameters for internal crosstalk, CAT 7A is superior to CAT 8 by more than 20 decibels.



Union Network Cabling


When work requires a unionized cabling group, call on Progressive Office Inc. for your commercial Cat5e/6/6a and fiber cabling projects. Specializing in cabling for data, voice, security and even the latest WiFi and LiFi solutions. Phone: (202) 462-4290

Structured Cabling, Cabling, Washington DC

Data Center Cabling Best Practices – Part 1

4 May 2017

Structured Cabling, Washington DC, New York CityModern data centers are equipped with devices and networking equipment that connect them. These devices demand increasingly greater bandwidth, and so their fiber or copper cabling must perform at a high level. Today’s data centers must be flexible, scalable, reliable, and manageable, making best practices required.



Planning the Infrastructure


Thus, documenting the existing and planned network, along with its equipment is needed. A flexible patching structure will permit the interconnection of devices at desired locations.



Structured Cabling


The structured approach of cabling revolves around the design of runs and connections that ease cable identification, maintenance, repair, and future expansion or reconfiguration. A Main Distribution Area (MDA) and Horizontal Distribution Area(s) (HDAs), along with two-post racks that permit improved access and cable management, will be needed.


MDA and HDA components must be of high quality and capable of bearing expected future loads. Their layout should have horizontal and vertical cable managers. The MDA contains primary cross-connects and core networking equipment. The HDA contains the cross-connects for the distribution of cables to Equipment Distribution Areas (EDAs). Patch cables will connect servers and storage by utilizing patch panels at their respective EDA.


Next, the equipment racks inside the data center must have their layout determined. A horizontal cabling configuration will be used for the distribution of cables from the HDA to the EDA. Flexible connectivity is required by a dynamic data center environment. The goal is the implementation of a system that transmits fiber channel, Ethernet, and other protocols.


Future port and application requirements will also need to be considered. Expansion and technological advances must be anticipated, so the installation of ports and cabling needed in the future should be done now to save on labor costs and downtime if upgrades are needed.



Structured Infrastructure Benefits



  • Cable identification and fault isolation simplified

  • Consistent cabling lays sound foundation for future

  • Future expansions and modifications made easier

  • Standard-compliant components from multiple vendors possible

  • Flexible connections provided


Cabling for Modular Data and High Density/High Port Count Fiber Equipment will be discussed in Part 2.



Union Network Cabling


When union work requires a unionized cabling group, call on Progressive Office Network Cabling for your commercial Cat5e/6/6a and fiber cabling projects. Specializing in cabling for data, voice, security and even the latest WiFi and LiFi solutions. Phone: (202) 462-4290

Data Cabling,Structured Cabling, Cabling Design-Washington DC

Structured Cabling Benefits for Your Business

28 Apr 2017

 Structured cabling, cable, Washington DCThe structuring of cabling will result in better organization and easier management of the cables. If you are a building manager or business owner, you may already know a bit about structured cabling. You may be currently thinking about its installation in your premises. In the most basic terms, structured cabling allows for several devices like computers and telephones to be connected via a cabling system infrastructure. The following discusses several benefits of structured cabling for a facility or office. Consult with experienced structured cabling professionals to get the best results.



Adaptability


Structured cabling is technology that allows business managers to plan and prepare for the future, making its implementation a valuable investment. Structured cabling that installs a newer cable such as Cat 6 will provide adequate bandwidth, making it viable for an extended period as a business’ IT needs gradually expand. The high bandwidth of a structured cabling system will also give a business the increased ability to adapt newer applications, devices, and technologies.



Diagnosis and Repairs Made Easier


Whenever issues occur on multiple, disorganized cabling systems, determining the source of the problems will be difficult. Although structured cabling is a unified system, it is organized in segments, making it much easier for technicians to locate malfunctions and repair them.



Flexibility at Lower Costs


The people, equipment, and offices of an organization are not static. Businesses evolve and restructure as time passes. Employees of a department may have to move to another area. The entire area of an office may also need renovation. Typically, changes like these grind business to a halt, hurting the bottom line. However, a structured cabling system allows a company’s staff to move to another part of an office, connect, resume working, and remain productive without missing a beat.



Networking


Employees will also be able to connect their devices into any outlet of a structured cabling system as opposed to a particular wire, promoting flexibility and productivity. In addition, a structured cable system will be able to convey data in multiple forms, allowing staff on a network to connect with other computers, servers, printers, and telephones.



Simplified Management


One of the greatest advantages of a structured cabling system is the elimination of disorganized and unsightly wires. The replacement of a configuration using multiple cabling with a structured cabling system will result in easier and less costly management by technicians as they will save time on repairs and restructurings.



Union Network Cabling


When union work requires a unionized cabling group, call on Union Network Cabling for your commercial Cat5e/6/6a and fiber cabling projects. Specializing in cabling for data, voice, security and even the latest WiFi and LiFi solutions. Phone: (202) 462-4290